Archive | nature RSS for this section

The Jewelry of Barbara Paganin

bijoucontemporain.unblog.fr Barbara Paganingioiellocontemporaneo.wordpress.com Barbara Paganinwww.galerie-orfeo.com Barbara Paganinwww.pinterest.com Barbara Paganinwww.klimt02.net Barbara Paganinhttp://www.galerie-orfeo.com/ausstellung-mars-mai-09-e.htmlhttp://www.galerie-orfeo.com/ausstellung-mars-mai-09-e.htmlhttp://www.galerie-orfeo.com/ausstellung-mars-mai-09-e.htmlhttp://www.galerie-orfeo.com/ausstellung-mars-mai-09-e.html45millst.tumblr.comwww.alaintruong.com

 

 

For information about her upcoming show, click here:

http://art925.wordpress.com/tag/barbara-paganin/

Advertisements

Quills

Porcupine quills have been used in jewelry, weapons, and items for the home for hundreds, if not thousands of years.  The porcupine, a slow-moving creature, who uses his quills to defend himself can have up to 30,000 on his back, making them a readily available source of decoration, provided that you know how to extract them!

The Native Americans were the most ardent users, softening the quills to weave them into leatherwork and basketry.  The traditional mohawk headdress, called a porky roach (I lie not), was actually based off the raised quills of a defensive porcupine.  The quills were also used in jewelry and detail work for jackets and shirts.  With the easy availability of beads, however, these traditional materials fell out of use, so that any type of porcupine quill decorations are fairly rare today.

www.photoraconteur.comwww.assiniboinetipis.com

whateverlowants.blogspot.com www.custommade.com www.artjewelryforum.orgwww.pinterest.com islandbohemian.com www.pinterest.com www.pinterest.comhttp://www.etsy.com/listing/124146999/wood-and-porcupine-quills-necklace?ref=market trendhunter.com

It could be worse….

bibi van der velden on www.pinterest.comtabithaemma.com www.brandywinejewelrysupply.com sidneyanndesigns.blogspot.com workschoolkids.blogspot.com itsbetterhandmade.com

 

On days like this, when Spring seems eternally to be just around the corner, yet not officially arriving, it’s important to remember: It could be worse.  It could be raining.

The Jewelry of Claire Baloge

clairebaloge.com clairebaloge.com clairebaloge.com clairebaloge.com

The Jewelry of Marta Mattson

martamattson.com martamattson.com martamattson.com martamattson.com martamattson.com  martamattson.com martamattson.commartamattson.commartamattson.commartamattson.commartamattson.commartamattson.commartamattson.commartamattson.com

Iridescent animals

I recently purchased this beautiful beetlewing necklace at the fantastic Erie Basin in Red Hook.  While most people are under the misapprehension that I’m wearing a chain full of Lee Press-On Nails (probably because I would wear a chain full of Lee Press-On Nails-DIY project!), they are actually the hind wings of Buprestidae beetles, otherwise known as jewel beetles or metallic wood-boring beetles.  Used in Asian decorative arts since the 1900s, they are being introduced awesomely in modern pieces by designers like Claire Angel (www.claireangel.com) or Skullbag on Etsy.

But beetles aren’t the only iridescent animals that lend their beauty to jewelry.  Starlings, peacocks, and morpho butterflies all share that brilliant sheen.  I have fantastical dreams of a statement necklace with all of them together!

skullbag on etsy

skullbag on etsy

skullbag on etsy

skullbag on etsy

necklace-Erie Basin

necklace-Erie Basin

Claire Angel

Claire Angel

morpho butterflies

morpho butterflies

peacock

peacock

grumpy starling

grumpy starling

starling feathers

starling feathers

 

%d bloggers like this: